Animal Welfare

Raise a Guide Dog and Change a Life

PETstock’s charity foundation, PETstock Assist, aims to raise $50,000 this month for Guide Dogs Australia to support the training that will help puppies become life changing Guide Dogs.

With the help of pet parents across the country, dedicated PETstock team members and the support of generous supply partners, PETstock Assist is donating to Guide Dogs Australia as part of their ongoing commitment to supporting the charity organisation.

PETstock Assist Charity and Events Coordinator, Jessica Guilfoyle, says the donation is all thanks to compassionate pet parents and PETstock’s retail partners, including ADVANCE, PAW by Blackmores, KONG Company and NexGard.

“It is estimated there are 450,000 Australians who are blind or have low vision.1 Together with the help of the pet community, PETstock Assist hopes to Raise a Guide Dog Change a Life with this $50,000 donation; the amount required to breed, raise, train, and match a suitable Guide Dog with a person with blindness or low vision.

“PETstock Assist has been a proud partner of Guide Dogs Australia since 2014 and we’re honoured to continue our support through this donation.”

Guide Dogs Australia National Corporate Partnerships Manager, Caroline Lee, says donations such as this allow Guide Dogs Australia to continue their work supporting people with blindness and low vision to lead safe and independent lives.

“Guide Dogs Australia relies heavily on donations from the community to help fund the majority of our important work,” Ms Lee said.

“It’s fantastic to have the support of PETstock and the broader community, so we can continue to support people with blindness and low vision, allowing them to lead the life they choose.”

How you can help

About Guide Dog training

  • It takes almost two years and more than $50,000 to breed, raise, train and place one Guide Dog.

Guide Dogs in public

  • A person with a Guide Dog in harness is legally allowed access in all public places and can go anywhere.
  • When working in harness, a Guide Dog should not be touched, fed or distracted from guiding its handler – remember, they’re hard at work! Interacting with a Guide Dog can detract from their work.
  • Avoid grabbing a person with a Guide Dog or the dog’s harness. First, ask the person if they need assistance.

For more information on the training process and access rights visit:
https://guidedogsaustralia.com/about-us/guide-dog-facts/

For more information on raising funds, sponsoring a pup, or volunteering visit: www.guidedogsaustralia.com/get-involved/.